Crowdfunding Woes

October 25, 2017

 

Would you like advice on how to run a successful crowdfunding campaign? Do you want to know which websites are the best for raising money for films? Do you wish you were clever enough to raise $78,000 for a film just to pull off the greatest non-con of all time? Me too. And I’m sure at some point we will write a blog all about that.

 

I’ve had my fair-share of fairly victoriously dismal crowdfunding campaigns. There is so much you learn about yourself and about others from the experience. So, if you’ve never run a crowdfunding campaign, then please heed my warning: it’s like having your soul judged.

 

After spending hours creating the perfect profile that will clearly exemplify the masterpiece you are getting ready to make, you have to hit the dreadful publish button. The world is going to know what you have been working on. The world will be free to judge, mock, or steal! And you feel a slight belief that the whole world will actually view your campaign and be completely dumbfounded by your genius.

 

Once your campaign is live, you’re like an attentive new parent. Checking in whenever you can, feeling anxious when you have to work, and hoping it’ll live up to its potential. Each passing minute of no donations is a representation of your failure as a parent.

 

Sure, you can count on a few donations here and there from a friend and family members, who you know just donates to avoid the awkward conversation of why they didn’t donate. You will get donations from the acting noobs, who think a donation will guarantee them a part in the film. You might even get a few surprise donations, and immediately enter a euphoric state.

 

But as the donations start to dwindle, you come down from your high just as quick as you went up. You start to doubt yourself. Remember all those campaigns you donated to? Surely, they will donate to yours. All of your friends can spare $5. What about those close friends of yours? The ones whose weddings you’ve attended. No, no, and no.

 

To have a successful crowdfunding campaign you have to be pushy and obnoxious, and you are just not ready for that. You believe the work should speak for itself. It’s true art for crying out loud! So, you slowly let your dream die. As the clock counts down, you feel more and more alone. Your friends, your colleagues, your former acting coaches have deserted you. You are left with one thing - isolation.

 

It’ll take a few weeks to recover, but I know it’s possible. I lived this nightmare. It took several glasses of wine, brownies, and slow walks in my childhood neighborhood at dusk, but I survived. Now I know who my true friends are and how strong I can truly be. I am a survivor.

 

Signed, the Bitter Blogger

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